Saturday, September 16, 2017

KEA General Curriculum

KEA stands for Kali, Eskrima, and Arnis. All three are different names for the same thing, so I like to just say KEA rather than choosing one and leaving out the others.

I've trained with some really talented KEA practitioners and I've noticed that what they teach can be generally organized into these four sections.

General Curriculum
1. Circular Motions
2. Angles of Attack
3. Arm Weaving
4. Arm Entanglement

There is more to KEA but at least to me it seems like these four are the basic pillars of skill development. 

You might ask: What about sparring? Sparring is a more extreme version of Arm Entanglement. 

1. Circular Motions
Many times circular motions are introduced as a warm up exercise. It's so important that Professor Remy Presas said that this needs to be done everyday. It takes time to develop articulation and strength in your wrists, the circular motions help with that. The circular motions may look fancy but they are not about showing off, but instead have very practical application. Circular motions help all your weapons, including empty hand, but especially shines with the knife.

2. Angles of Attack
The forms that you learn in KEA are called the Angles of Attack. There are many numerous Angles of Attack forms. I do recommend that you learn as many as you can, but keep in mind it's not about the quantity, but the quality, meaning how much time you spend practicing and understanding the form. I encourage people to progress the forms and experience them in as many different ways as possible.

3. Arm Weaving
The most famous Arm Weaving technique is the Heaven 6. Arm weaving teaches you to handle two weapons simultaneously without getting them in each other's way. People mistakingly think that Arm weaving skills require that you have 2 weapons in a real life situation, but that's not what it's really about. Arm weaving is about fighting with both arms.

4. Arm Entanglement
This is the most difficult area in KEA because it has many things to learn. First you learn a repeated pattern which I call a Generator. The generator is practiced with a partner. Then you start adding other techniques such as a trapping strike, submission, take down, throw, and disarm. 

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